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Christopher Pissarides

Winner of the 2010 Nobel Prize for Economics

Christopher Pissarides Biography

Sir Christopher Pissarides is a British-Cypriot economist who is currently a professor of Economics and Political Science at the London School of Economics (LSE).

Pissarides’ influential research into unemployment, labour markets and growth has seen him become a global authority in his field.

Awards, accolades, achievements, honours

  • Professor of Economics and Political Science London School of Economics (2012 present)
  • Gold Medal for Outstanding Contribution to Public Discourse – The College Historical Society, Trinity College Dublin (2012)
  • Foreign Honorary Member – American Economic Association (2011)
  • President – European Economic Association (2011)
  • The Grand Cross – Republic of Cyprus (2011)
  • Laiki Chair in European Studies – University of Cyprus (2010 present)
  • Nobel Prize for Economics (with Dale Mortensen and Peter A. Diamond) (2010)
  • Vice President – European Economic Association (2009)
  • Aristeion for the Arts, Literature and Sciences – Republic of Cyprus (2008)
  • Norman Sosnow Chair in Economics London School of Economics (2006 2012)
  • Fellow – European Economic Association (2005)
  • IZA Prize for Labour Economics – Institute for the Study of Labour (with Dale Mortensen) (2005)
  • Elected council member – European Economic Association (2005 present)
  • Elected council member – Econometric Society (2005 2010)
  • Fellow – British Academy (2002)
  • Research Fellow Institute for the Study of Labour (2001 present)
  • External member – Cyprus Monetary Policy Committee (2000 2007)
  • Fellow – Econometric Society (1997)
  • Member – Employment Taskforce of the European Commission (chaired by Wim Kok) (2003 2004)
  • Elected member – Council, Royal Economic Society (1996 2003)
  • Research Fellow – Centre for Economic Policy Research (1994 present)
  • Professor of Economics London School of Economics (1986 2012)
  • Reader in Economics – London School of Economics (1982 – 1986)
  • Lecturer in Economics – London School of Economics (1976 1982)
  • Lecturer in Economics – University of Southampton (1974 1976)
  • Economic Research Department – Central Bank of Cyprus (1974)
  • Pissarides has also received Honorary Doctorates from several universities, including the University of Essex and the University of Cyprus

Background / History

Pissarides studied economics at the University of Essex and was awarded a London University scholarship to continue his studies at a post-graduate level. He attended the LSE, achieving his Ph.D. in economics in 1973.

Career

Knowledge, intelligence, approachability and enthusiasm allow Christopher Pissarides to explain the importance of economic growth and to detail how this may be achieved now and for the future.

An internationally renowned economist, Sir Christopher Pissarides is currently Professor of Economics and Political Science at LSE. In 2010, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Economics along with his colleagues Peter A. Diamond and Dale Mortensen in recognition of their work in the theory of search friction and macroeconomics.

Pissarides work tends to focus on his specialisms; these include labour-market theory, labour-market policy, the economic impacts of unemployment and factors concerning growth and structural changes. During his career, he has produced numerous influential articles and books and has served as editor for many more. Equilibrium Unemployment Theory is his best known book and its reputation among economists is demonstrated by the fact it is now in its second edition. Pissarides has held editorial positions with several globally significant economic journals, including the Economic Journal, Economica, AEJ Macroeconomics and the Review of Middle East Economics and Finance (BEP).

An articulate and inspirational professor, Pissarides has taught at several universities, including LSE, the University of Cyprus and the University of Southampton. He held the prestigious Norman Sosnow Chair in Economics at LSE for six years between 2006 and 2012. In addition to his current role at LSE, he is also a visiting lecturer, inspiring some of the worlds most promising future economists at establishments such as Yale and Harvard.

Current / Past Roles & Positions

  • Awarded the Nobel Prize for Economics with Peter A. Diamond and Dale Mortensen in 2010
  • Professor of Economics and Political Science at LSE
  • Norman Sosnow Chair in Economics at LSE for six years (2006 – 2012)
  • Author of ‘Equilibrium Unemployment Theory’

Christopher Pissarides Videos

Christopher Pissarides‘s Topics

Macroeconomics of Labour Markets

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Labour Market Policy

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Wage Inequality

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Structural Change

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Comparative Economic Performance

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Economic Growth Indicators

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The Economics of Unemployment

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Books by Christopher Pissarides

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Christopher Pissarides book
Christopher Pissarides book
Christopher Pissarides book

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